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A question of time

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  • A question of time

    Hi everybody, I have a question about Seiko automatic watches. I was thinking about buying one for everyday use but then I read online that they are accurate to within +/-15 seconds a day. Now to the uninitiated that sounds like a lot - I'm not sure I want to drop a grand on a watch that will need resetting maybe twice a week. Is this normal for automatic watches? If so, what are the other alternatives to replaceable batteries which keep reasonably accurate time? I thank you for your time, patience and expertise.

  • #2
    Remember it’s a plus and minus thing so there are swings and round abouts. To be fair some run either/or and if you remove at night how you place it can effect the gain or loss. Also that’s an extreme, most are a tad more accurate. They can also once bedded in usually be adjusted to a few seconds a day. Either by a watchmaker or yourself if you get the tools. So In practice the stated accuracy has a negligible impact in real life. Also like many things, more you pay, the better the movement and greater the accuracy. Grand Seiko is accurate to a few seconds a day or less and the quartz GS to a few seconds a year. Note to you have to reset the day every few months in any case which is as much as I’d ever reset an automatic… if I ever wore a single one for that long. Besides it’s far more fun having an auto and getting it just right than having a boring old digital!

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    • #3
      What kb said... mechanical Seiko accuracy is generally plenty more than good enough - what model are you considering ?

      Originally posted by kiwi.bloke View Post
      Also that’s an extreme, most are a tad more accurate.

      They can also once bedded in usually be adjusted to a few seconds a day. Either by a watchmaker or yourself if you get the tools.

      So In practice the stated accuracy has a negligible impact in real life.
      Harlan
      Timekeeper Watch Club
      New Zealand, Pacific Ocean, Earth

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      • #4
        Based on what people have said on various platforms, Seiko seems to estimate their accuracy extremely conservatively and in most cases a lot of their higher end models would fall within COSC specs, and yet for the most part, they don’t advertise to have anywhere such accuracy for their mechanical models.

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        • #5
          Hi Harlan - I love the Prospex Save The Ocean model. I really like the divers watches as I am a gentleman of substance and smaller watches get lost on my tree trunk wrists.

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          • #6
            Perhaps you should consider the Solar,or Spring drive models , they are super accurate, and no batteries.

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            • #7
              Spring Drive tends to cost maybe a wee tad more unfortunately.

              But, plenty of watches about... possibly 25 Posts then list a WTB, looking for a good buy is 50%+ of the fun!

              ARNIE Solar was decently priced recently on DROP (purchased aplenty/re-listed on local auction site for 2x cost

              Again how vital is accuracy... timing any atmosphere reentry's, passenger train departures, or just eggs/carparks ?

              Click image for larger version  Name:	Seiko-Prospex-Save-The-Ocean-Antarctica-Monster-SRPG57K1-Baby-Tuna-SRPG59K1-hands-on-2-2048x1367.jpg Views:	0 Size:	137.3 KB ID:	70246
              Harlan
              Timekeeper Watch Club
              New Zealand, Pacific Ocean, Earth

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              • #8
                The penguine feet on those dials are awesome. Just realised Seiko went back to a day date function and 4R movement for the Monster, I winder why they wound back the call to go to the 6R date only movement on the gen3?
                the new black monster does look pretty sweet….

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