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SRP637 Baby Tuna Crystal Replacement

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  • SRP637 Baby Tuna Crystal Replacement

    Hi all, I swapped the crystal in my Baby Tuna tonight and took a few pics, thought you might like to see! I picked up a sapphire double-dome with purple AR coating from Crystal Times. I've installed a double dome from DLW Watches before on my SKX, but found this one a much easier process & it only took me 15m from start to finish...! Maybe because I've done it before, but regardless this one seemed much more straightforward.




























    And finally both my mod watches in a winder together. Not that good an AR shot but you can see the SKX has a slightly blue-er tinge.




  • #2
    Awesome!

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    • #3
      That’s very cool! I would be keen to swap the crystals on a couple of my watches... but it ain’t going to be me doing it!

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      • #4
        Nice work Thanks for sharing. Excellent photography too, BTW.
        On the instruments we entrust to pace our lives, to bear witness to our days, and to be the keepers of the most precious thing we have... time.

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        • #5
          Thanks guys, this one was super easy to do with a crystal press and some YouTube research but I’m going to get it pressure tested before getting it wet. I did buy a replacement gasket at the same time but didn’t need to use it (this watch is only a month old)

          Thanks Don those pics are 100% the camera not me ..!

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          • #6
            Looks great! Amazing what a sapphire crystal can do to the look/feel of even the cheapest Seiko.
            If I think of something witty, I'll be sure to write it here.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by sjb View Post
              Looks great! Amazing what a sapphire crystal can do to the look/feel of even the cheapest Seiko.
              Agree 100%, the joy of modding!!

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              • #8
                Now that’s the joy of this hobby. One day I will have time and skill to enjoy modding. Thanks for sharing


                Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

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                • #9
                  cset you are crushing it Sir, 10/10 great job, solid commitment

                  Pressure Tester.... hmmm..... nah unless the watch is old, or getting used in a spa pool, or in the dishes, it'll mostly be A-OK


                  My timer crapped out a few years ago, instead of replacing it with another uüber costly Swiss unit I got a #1900 Weishi MADE IN cheapaschips CHINA... and although the Weishi can't talk to my computer, it actually does all I need, really really well... I only want check a couple of things, I don't really need PC Integration, any level of sophstocation or a printer at all apparently

                  I've still got my old Bergeon 5555/98 pressure tester, I've had a few in addition over the (10-11) years but the 5555 Bergeon proves superior, it's gone the distance... you don't really need a lot of tools, not to do most jobs anyway.... and still the most expensive tools I have bought are a quality Bergeon ROLEX rotating ring tool ($$$), maybe the giant Bergeon press I have, a huge Bergeon case opener & maybe the #5555 pressure tester... I do have real costly screwdrivers but if you don't mind a slightly lesser performance & are prepared to file them/repair the heads a bit cheaper ones will do.... the best tool for the Omega Pro Bezels (or DAYTONA etc) is the HOROTEC case crab...

                  Great job on the mods, you have probably done a better job than 75% of watchmakers in shops who charge money for this job would have done.

                  Most important thing, IMVHO, is:

                  A: To genuinely care about the watch/owner &
                  B: To take your jolly good time & be wholly totally prepared before you (finally) start

                  Always, regardless, pays to look at a caseback (rear aperture) gasket... and treat it kind, don't stretch it, don't mess it up, don't get it caught... clean it & grease it (silicone grease)... carefully re-install the rear cover, mostly you will be golden

                  JM2CW because remember that basically I know nothing



                  PS: I'm no expert, but most watches I've seen fail a pressure test fail via the glass gasket as it see's UV.... crowns are next (due to the 'Crown Fiddler') while the last place for a watch to fail a pressure test is normally again via the rear aperture aka case back... again, YMMV
                  Harlan
                  Timekeeper Watch Club
                  Auckland, New Zealand, Pacific Ocean, Earth

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