Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

WIS in training

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • WIS in training

    As a WIS in training I want to know where I should start and what I need to break down and rebuild a watch.

    If it was a mechanic and learning about combustion engines I would grab some spanners, maybe a wrench and demolish a lawn mower.

    If I was jedi learning about the force I would grab a helmet with a visor you couldn't see through, a levitating robot that could shoot laser beams and a light saber.

    Where the best place to start with a watch (most basic movement) and what's my basic tool set?

    Gasmask21

  • #2
    Stick with the light saber, it is easier and you don't need such good eyesight
    breaking the watch down ,that's easy , putting it back together ? back to the light saber again :roll: :roll:
    I don't suffer from insanity, I enjoy every minute of it.

    Nothing is fool-proof to a sufficiently talented fool.

    Comment


    • #3
      Start with a cheap Chinese automatic movement .
      But I agree with the Doc " may the force be with you " when you want to put it together
      Rest easy Matty , My best Mate and Son

      Comment


      • #4
        As a WIS in training I want to know where I should start and what I need to break down and rebuild a watch.

        If it was a mechanic and learning about combustion engines I would grab some spanners, maybe a wrench and demolish a lawn mower.

        If I was jedi learning about the force I would grab a helmet with a visor you couldn't see through, a levitating robot that could shoot laser beams and a light saber.

        Where the best place to start with a watch (most basic movement) and what's my basic tool set?

        Gasmask21
        The Doctor and Pedro may be right. However,you might want to try Pocket watches first as they are very similar to basic wristwatches, relatively cheap to buy, and much bigger. I would also recommend a book "The Pocket Watch" Restoration, maintenance and repair. By Christopher Barrow. It covers a great many areas a WIS in training would find invaluable. After you have mastered Manual wind watches you may go on to automatics, chronographs and other complications. (I'm still on manual winds after 10 years as I am only a hobbyist).
        Two of the most important things you will need are, 1. Patience and 2. The ability to know when you are defeated.
        Over the years I have found watch repair and restoration a fascinating frustrating, maddening and enjoyable pastime.
        Preparation and planning prevent piss poor performance

        Comment


        • #5
          As a WIS in training I want to know where I should start and what I need to break down and rebuild a watch....

          Another great open, Gasmask21 Just like you, I’m also in training--which explains the constant need to find new er.. training material.

          The Captain has some very useful input above, and I’d like to put forward my spin on the discussion. First, I’d like to say that you’ve already found the best place to start, and that’s right here on these pages. However, it might be good to think about what you are actually training to be, as this can be quite confusing for a lot of people. This means that, IMHO, before you get your hands dirty, you should get your mind dirty. :D

          Are you training to be a WIS or a watchmaker?

          In my relatively short ‘training’ experience, I’ve found that: 1. Most accomplished watchmakers are not WIS, and 2. Most accomplished WIS are not watchmakers.

          This is also true in the car world: 1. Most mechanics are neither collectors, nor reviewers, of fine automobiles. 2. Most reviewers in the leading car publications of the world are not trained mechanics.

          IMO, the word “watch” that appears in watchmaker is not the same as the “watch” that appear in Watch Idiot Savant (WIS).

          The “watch” in watchmaker denotes a portable device that measures or shows the progress of time. Therefore, a watchmaker is someone who makes or repairs watches (thus defined).

          The “watch” in WIS, however, refers not just to time-keeping instrument, but all its tangible and intangible values—its design, its actual (as opposed to intended) usage, its heritage and lineage, what statement is conveys, its significance or impact in our lives, the bond it forms with us, as well as the reflection it provides on our shifting values, changing tastes, and even as a means of social discourse.

          To be a WIS, one must not only understand the details, technique, or principles of the watch (as per this second definition), but also enjoy the watch with discrimination and appreciation of its subtleties. That is to say, a WIS is a connoisseur who is competent to act as a critical judge.

          This is perhaps why it takes more than technical knowledge of a watchmaker to be a true WIS—the same way it takes more than the mastery of a Light Saber to be a true Jedi Knight. And why only some watchmakers manage to be a WIS at the same time.

          With that said, learning basic watchmaking skills will no doubt help you to appreciate the watch more. If you are following basic introductory watch disassembly and reassembly instructions, then the best movement to start off with is the exact same movement as the guide uses to demonstrate. That’s the only way you can navigate the steps . Most introductory courses will begin with a simple movement, i.e. a manual-winding calibre with no automatic system or Date wheel. Once you are competent with the basic movement, automatics and Date wheels are introduced. Most WISs who embark on this will likely stop here, as they’ve gained sufficient understanding of the movement to develop an appreciation for its intricacies. Most will never be able to diagnose or make repairs, but then again, that’s what watchmakers are there for.
          On the instruments we entrust to pace our lives, to bear witness to our days, and to be the keepers of the most precious thing we have... time.

          Comment


          • #6
            Great post Don :thumbup:

            There's an watch making course on Timezone that has two levels.
            http://www.timezonewatchschool.com/WatchSchool/

            It could be fun.
            The Way of a Warrior is based on humanity, love, and sincerity; the heart of martial valor is true bravery, wisdom, love, and friendship. Emphasis on the physical aspects of warriorship is futile, for the power of the body is always limited - Osensei

            Comment


            • #7
              Thanks guys this is all really interesting as Im wondering similar things to Gasmask.
              Im also v interested in learning to fanatically manicure the outside of watches - at least they will still work after Ive been busy "learning" from them, though they may look like rubbish !

              Don, you are of course right about how much we can hope to actually achieve - a properly trained professional working daily in their field will (one hopes!) have an understanding and a whole raft of tricks learned on-the-job that will put the amateur to shame. I like working on my cars but when I hit a tricky problem and take it to my mechanic I can only stand and watch in awe as he does something in two minutes flat which would take me half a day of dark muttering and skinned knuckles. Or he will diagnose something I would never have dreamed of! He has reached that level of understanding and practice that we call "expert".

              Still, there is hope for us in that research has suggested the 10000 hour rule: That anyone can become a real "expert" in anything they spend 10000 hours mastering...
              I was surprised by this theory - surely talent has a role to play ?? But the idea is that yes, talented individuals will flourish first and pull ahead, but that over time (and 10000 hrs is a looong time) the lesser mortals among us will catch up and be just as good.
              Ive gotta say I still have my reservations about this. Surely with the arts this cant apply? Isn't a lot of that innate?
              Say with music you might be able to teach proper rhythm to a seemingly hopeless case over 10000 hrs. But can you ever teach them inspiration - will they ever manage to be more than a talented mimic??
              This perhaps crosses over in WIS-dom as Don has mentioned- professional training as a watchmaker might never instill any real taste or understanding of a watch's less tangible, "arty" properties.
              I have digressed somewhat but there is hope : While training to be an Idiot Savant may infact be a contradiction in terms, it should only take us all thirty years at an hour per day practice, or a mere ten years at three hours per day, to become really expert Idiots !
              My karma ran over your dogma

              Comment


              • #8
                It should only take us all thirty years at an hour per day practice, or a mere ten years at three hours per day, to become really expert Idiots !
                This is where natural talent kicks in ,
                Some people have to work hard at it.
                Me ,!! I am gifted with it !!!
                I was born to be an expert IDIOT
                Rest easy Matty , My best Mate and Son

                Comment


                • #9
                  Hi jakem,

                  Where abouts in Wellington are you? I am down the Kapiti Coast.

                  Cheers
                  Tony Lewis
                  New Zealand

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Hi Im in Wellington City - Brooklyn to be precise...
                    Saw your call for a watch club get together - Im keen for a meet !
                    Will PM you...
                    J
                    My karma ran over your dogma

                    Comment


                    • #11

                      Still, there is hope for us in that research has suggested the 10000 hour rule: That anyone can become a real "expert" in anything they spend 10000 hours mastering...



                      Thank you for the thoughtful input, jakem.

                      I join you in questioning this theory, as it does sound like “Follow our advice for 10,000 hours, and you’ll be an expert, or your money back!!”… Of course, 10,000 hours later, the source of the advice is likely to be long gone, skipped town, and the guarantee long expired. The research findings also contradicts the commonly accepted “the more we know, the more we know how much we don’t know” (just imagine how much we’ll know we don’t know after 10,000 hours).

                      A journey of 10,000 steps can indeed get you places, but only if 1) you walk in the right direction (10,000 steps of walking in a circle won’t be you very far) and 2) you occasionally look back to review, reflect, and learn. It is the latter, IMHO, that leads to wisdom. I also believe that, sometime, we may never reach our intended destination, but it’s still important that we nonetheless keep walking in the right direction.

                      On a positive note, the 10,000 theory does provide one very crucial thing that is essential for keeping us alive. That thing is hope.
                      On the instruments we entrust to pace our lives, to bear witness to our days, and to be the keepers of the most precious thing we have... time.

                      Comment


                      • #12

                        Still, there is hope for us in that research has suggested the 10000 hour rule: That anyone can become a real "expert" in anything they spend 10000 hours mastering...


                        Thank you for the thoughtful input, jakem.

                        I join you in questioning this theory, as it does sound like “Follow our advice for 10,000 hours, and you’ll be an expert, or your money back!!”… Of course, 10,000 hours later, the source of the advice is likely to be long gone, skipped town, and the guarantee long expired. The research findings also contradicts the commonly accepted “the more we know, the more we know how much we don’t know” (just imagine how much we’ll know we don’t know after 10,000 hours).

                        A journey of 10,000 steps can indeed get you places, but only if 1) you walk in the right direction (10,000 steps of walking in a circle won’t be you very far) and 2) you occasionally look back to review, reflect, and learn. It is the latter, IMHO, that leads to wisdom. I also believe that, sometime, we may never reach our intended destination, but it’s still important that we nonetheless keep walking in the right direction.

                        On a positive note, the 10,000 theory does provide one very crucial thing that is essential for keeping us alive. That thing is hope.

                        I agree with you about the journey part Don. Taking time to reflect, review and learn are important steps. For me the whole 10,000 hours theory thing is more about showing people that anything is possible if you try hard enough than becoming a master at something.
                        The Way of a Warrior is based on humanity, love, and sincerity; the heart of martial valor is true bravery, wisdom, love, and friendship. Emphasis on the physical aspects of warriorship is futile, for the power of the body is always limited - Osensei

                        Comment

                        Working...
                        X