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  • Omega seamaster service

    My Father has a 5ish year old seamaster that started losing time. He took it to Partridge jewellers in Wellington where it was purchased from, and they sent it to the authorised repair center who have sent a quote of $1650 to service. Is there anybody that can service and get parts for these new watches? as he was told by a friend it is a closed shop and only authorised repairers can buy parts.
    Who would you recommend?

    Cheers
    Glenn

  • #2
    Hi Glenn. Omega parts are difficult to source by independent watch makers for sure, however at this stage it may not need parts. There are 2-3 independent watchmakers around with good recommendations from TKNZ members - pilbrows in Taupo, Blair at Watch on Broadway (he may have relocated to Rotorua?) and Ian Daniels in Waikanae (he was originally Omega trained), to name just three.
    I have used the later two with good results, albeit not for an Omega service.
    Other members should be able to provide some other wisdom.
    Good luck and it is always good to have the end result reported, for the benefit of others.
    Cheers.
    'Beauty is in the eye of the beholder' - but lets face it some people have better eyesight than others!

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    • #3
      Thanks for the reply.

      I have my rolex at Pilbrows at the moment for a new main spring and the service, which they do when replacing the main spring which is costing $1020 so not overly cheap. I had it serviced at watches on broadway 4 years ago at a cost of $400 which was reasonable.

      Unfortunately I am a week too late as Dad has already given the go ahead. The email he received said the following repairs are required: complete service, sapphire crystal, movement parts, set of seals and pressure test. $1670 inc gst

      What sort of parts would you expect to replace on a 6yo watch that is worn daily in an office?

      I have told him to get an exact break down of what is done and replaced when he gets it back

      Cheers

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      • #4
        Actually sent you a PM middle of last month, and then another PM recently (yesterday) lol

        Harlan
        Timekeeper Watch Club
        Auckland, New Zealand, Pacific Ocean, Earth

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        • #5
          Sorry, have just seen your message. There is only 1 there, the other probably went when the forums were changed. I don't really expect any messages so don't check in there, I am in Wellington. This is the first time I have asked about Omega servicing, last year I was asking about rolex servicing.

          Cheers
          Last edited by skyline_glenn; 07-02-18, 21:31.

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          • #6
            I wonder why a 6 year old watch should need a new sapphire gLass,they are expensive and do not wear out. Remember you are legally entitled to have all the old parts returned to you for your inspection when you collect the repair.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Horos View Post
              I wonder why a 6 year old watch should need a new sapphire gLass,they are expensive and do not wear out. Remember you are legally entitled to have all the old parts returned to you for your inspection when you collect the repair.
              That is what I can't understand. It might have a few light scratches but nothing really bad. I guess they want to send the watch back looking like new.

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              • #8
                An update on the service. He picked it up on Saturday at a cost of $1670. There was no breakdown of parts used and no parts returned, they said it had a new sapphire crystal and they will try and get the old parts sent back. He wasnt impressed, especially with the cost being 1/3 the price of the watch. He said next time it needs fixing it will be going into the drawer and he will use his old quartz watch.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by skyline_glenn View Post
                  An update on the service. He picked it up on Saturday at a cost of $1670. There was no breakdown of parts used and no parts returned, they said it had a new sapphire crystal and they will try and get the old parts sent back. He wasnt impressed, especially with the cost being 1/3 the price of the watch. He said next time it needs fixing it will be going into the drawer and he will use his old quartz watch.


                  Thanks for the update, Glenn ...I just caught up on earlier posts today. Sorry to hear of the unsavory experience that you father had. Please pass on the message to him, though, that the next time the watch needs fixing, to let you seek advice from the forum first. You may not be aware of it, but among the members above, there is a watchmaker and someone well-connected to watchmakers and Omega parts, else you can contact me.

                  Over the decades, one of the most successful myth perpetuated by Swiss watch brands is that the kind of money your father paid is just "a fact of life", no other choice. You’ve probably heard so many times the adage “You get what you pay for.”. This saying has roots going back to the 15th Century, when it was indeed a fact of life for cottage industries of the day. With the wider application of marketing principles, this idea was picked up again during the 1960s to point out to consumers the intrinsic values that more expensive products had over their budget competitors.

                  This was a good thing, because by letting buyers know that they have bought a product of superior quality, the buyer satisfaction is increased. It allowed manufacturers to continue producing quality goods and to progressively improve their standards, because they could receive more money in return. During those times, higher price did mean higher value for most things, including watches.

                  However, during the 90s, there seemed to be a shift in the Swiss watch industry. They figured out that customer satisfaction was not just what the customer actually got in terms of the physical product, but rather what the customer perceived they got. They also found out what pushed that buyer perception, and they channeled their investment in that direction. Capital flowed from R&D and in-house manufacturing technology into marketing activities to bolster brand image. This heightened customer’s perception of value, and in turn, increased customer satisfaction, even when the quality of the physical product remained unchanged and prices rose.

                  Then came the ah-ha! moment in luxury brand marketing. Exploiting the “You get what you pay for” belief now deeply ingrained in the psyche of most luxury watch buyers, Swiss brands found that the adage works both ways… High price alone creates higher perception of value… The buyer complains of the higher price tag, but still buys the product, and then the buyer themselves self-fulfills the prophesy.

                  They now think they have received higher value because “High price must mean high value.”… I believe this strategy is now deployed in post-sale servicing too. The higher the price charged by authorized service centres, the higher the standard of work perceived by the customer. Most customers will pay, complain, but then self-fulfills the myth. The customer will justify it as the price of ownership, exclusivity, or whatever crap they are sold by the brand.

                  You will notice this more the higher the brand status. They shift from what used to be the traditional purpose of servicing, i.e. to keep the watch functioning and properly-maintained, to a depraved and unrealistic one of overdoing and replacing everything to make a watch look like new. This is all so that a higher fee can be charged, and maintain the “higher price means higher value” perception among their customers.
                  Last edited by Don; 19-03-18, 15:00.
                  A watch journey that also serves the betterment of others is one worth taking.

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