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  • #16
    Originally posted by taskitan View Post
    Thanks Don and Harlan.

    I gave it a good wind up and left it overnight last night just to be sure and it wasn't ticking by this morning. Put a YouTube video on and was shaking it for a good 5 mins or so (probably risking an RSI).

    Gave it another shake up after tea earlier this evening and its losing time already. That being said, I did get this one back around 10' when they came out IIRC.

    ...
    If you don't mind, let's investigate this further before you send it in for servicing--for 7S26/7S36 worn infrequently in rotation with other watches like most of us enthusiasts do, eight years is nothing!

    What you are doing is probably exactly what the Seiko instruction manual recommends, i.e. swing it for 30 secs and wear it. However, Seiko also makes the assumption that we wear our 7S36 at least 8 hours a day, and lead reasonably active lives while wearing the watch. This is, unfortunately, not the case for most of us today, myself included. So, these workhorse movements do need all the help they can get to keep them from being embarrassingly off from the time shown on our desktop or phone.

    If you're willing to entertain this a little further, please try this for me...

    Holding the watch dial-up by the straps, swing it from side-to-side in a horizontal arc (to avoid RSI , you needn't use too much force nor exert too much).





    Alternatively, you can hold the watch in the same way, and swirl it in a circular motion, the circumference of a tennis ball, or like you would a glass of brandy. Either way, do this 400 times. Set the time and Day/Date, and rest it in any position you like (e.g. crown-up), and see how long the movement runs for. The specification is 40 hours.

    You mentioned also that earlier this evening, the watch lost time... Now, if it loses time then soon after stops, then this is due to the natural lost in time was the mainspring nears the end of it supply of torque. However, if you are saying that the watch loses time constantly, then this may be a separate issue to the health of its mainspring or the winding efficiency. You may need to look into the daily rate in a variety of positions, and assess the amount of positional errors, a better indication as to whether the movement requires an overhaul.

    For further reading see... https://www.timekeeper.co.nz/forum/w...6776#post36776




    Last edited by Don; 27-06-18, 21:50.
    A watch journey that also serves the betterment of others is one worth taking.

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    • #17
      Originally posted by Don View Post


      If you don't mind, let's investigate this further before you send it in for servicing--for 7S26/7S36 worn infrequently in rotation with other watches like most of us enthusiasts do, eight years is nothing!

      What you are doing is probably exactly what the Seiko instruction manual recommends, i.e. swing it for 30 secs and wear it. However, Seiko also makes the assumption that we wear our 7S36 at least 8 hours a day, and lead reasonably active lives while wearing the watch. This is, unfortunately, not the case for most of us today, myself included. So, these workhorse movements do need all the help they can get to keep them from being embarrassingly off from the time shown on our desktop or phone.

      If you're willing to entertain this a little further, please try this for me...

      Holding the watch dial-up by the straps, swing it from side-to-side in a horizontal arc (to avoid RSI , you needn't use too much force nor exert too much).





      Alternatively, you can hold the watch in the same way, and swirl it in a circular motion, the circumference of a tennis ball, or like you would a glass of brandy. Either way, do this 400 times. Set the time and Day/Date, and rest it in any position you like (e.g. crown-up), and see how long the movement runs for. The specification is 40 hours.

      You mentioned also that earlier this evening, the watch lost time... Now, if it loses time then soon after stops, then this is due to the natural lost in time was the mainspring nears the end of it supply of torque. However, if you are saying that the watch loses time constantly, then this may be a separate issue to the health of its mainspring or the winding efficiency. You may need to look into the daily rate in a variety of positions, and assess the amount of positional errors, a better indication as to whether the movement requires an overhaul.

      For further reading see... https://www.timekeeper.co.nz/forum/w...6776#post36776



      Thanks Don.

      I'll give that another go with the circular motion this time and I'll report back in the morning!

      Fingers crossed!

      Comment


      • #18
        Gave it a go winding it again, dead as a piece of driftwood this morning.

        I would like to have a new sapphire crystal installed... so off it's gone to Precision Watch Co.

        Thanks for the help guys.

        Comment


        • #19
          Originally posted by taskitan View Post
          Gave it a go winding it again, dead as a piece of driftwood this morning.

          I would like to have a new sapphire crystal installed... so off it's gone to Precision Watch Co.

          Thanks for the help guys.
          Great that gave it a try. Now you know, with greater certainty, that work is needed. I'm sure you're in good hands.
          A watch journey that also serves the betterment of others is one worth taking.

          Comment

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