Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Seeing in the New Year.

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • LeroyC
    replied
    I was asleep at midnight, but up at 0250 for work. At which point I slapped on the trusty Pulsar (photo from last week).



    HAPPY NEW YEAR!!
    Last edited by LeroyC; 02-01-19, 20:55.

    Leave a comment:


  • captainscarlet1
    commented on 's reply
    That's a great story Don. Quite remarkable how these mechanical marvels can ingratiate themselves into our lives.

  • captainscarlet1
    commented on 's reply
    Classy looking watch that one Pete

  • David
    replied
    Originally posted by Don View Post
    Thank you for starting this thread, Alex.

    Mine comes a with the usual long-winded story—no pun intended ...In 1960, my dad bought his very first watch on his first paycheck, and really wore this watch for everything from going to work, gardening, cycling, playing sports, and yeah, meeting and marrying my mum in the early-1970s. During the quartz-is-king 80s, this automatic watch was assigned to the bottom of his drawer, and my dad only wore Seiko Quartz watches from memory. But then, when I was around 15 and my Pulsar Digital died, he located this old by-then-non-running watch, got itoverhauled, and lent it to me ...not "gave", but just a loan

    At the time, I had never owned a mechanical watch, much less any watch with hands. I was captivated by its archaic mechanism, reliance on the unreliable human movement, and its imperfect perfection. As a high school kid, this thing, a outdated time-keeping machine in the era of TAG Heuer F1 was so charmingly intoxicating, I didn’t get around to doing drugs The watch was, to me, the portal that led me nearly three decades later to replying to this forum topic on New Year’s Eve, though it was, at the time, just a loan watch.

    Recently this year, that loan watch, the one that started it all, became my watch.





    A little bit about this 60+ year-old Mido Multifort Powerwind (info only intended for mechanical nuts, like me)... It was manufactured in the late-1950s, and powered by the Mido Cal 917P automatic, 17 jewels, 18'000 A/hr. The movement manufacturer A Schild (AS) produced this particular ebauche exclusively for Mido from 1952-1960. To my understanding, the Mido 917P is the only large-scale produced calibre with a free-oscillating hairspring regulator, i.e. there are no pins holding the hairspring. This was designed to counter isochronism.


    To all, have a terrific start to 2019. Thank you everyone for your contribution to our forum.
    Awesome post

    Sent from my CPH1723 using Tapatalk

    Leave a comment:


  • 22henry
    replied
    Happy new year all

    Leave a comment:


  • Brucy
    replied
    Happy new year gents, 2018 has been a pleasure with you all

    Leave a comment:


  • Don
    replied
    Thank you for starting this thread, Alex.

    Mine comes a with the usual long-winded story—no pun intended ...In 1960, my dad bought his very first watch on his first paycheck, and really wore this watch for everything from going to work, gardening, cycling, playing sports, and yeah, meeting and marrying my mum in the early-1970s. During the quartz-is-king 80s, this automatic watch was assigned to the bottom of his drawer, and my dad only wore Seiko Quartz watches from memory. But then, when I was around 15 and my Pulsar Digital died, he located this old by-then-non-running watch, got itoverhauled, and lent it to me ...not "gave", but just a loan

    At the time, I had never owned a mechanical watch, much less any watch with hands. I was captivated by its archaic mechanism, reliance on the unreliable human movement, and its imperfect perfection. As a high school kid, this thing, a outdated time-keeping machine in the era of TAG Heuer F1 was so charmingly intoxicating, I didn’t get around to doing drugs The watch was, to me, the portal that led me nearly three decades later to replying to this forum topic on New Year’s Eve, though it was, at the time, just a loan watch.

    Recently this year, that loan watch, the one that started it all, became my watch.





    A little bit about this 60+ year-old Mido Multifort Powerwind (info only intended for mechanical nuts, like me)... It was manufactured in the late-1950s, and powered by the Mido Cal 917P automatic, 17 jewels, 18'000 A/hr. The movement manufacturer A Schild (AS) produced this particular ebauche exclusively for Mido from 1952-1960. To my understanding, the Mido 917P is the only large-scale produced calibre with a free-oscillating hairspring regulator, i.e. there are no pins holding the hairspring. This was designed to counter isochronism.


    To all, have a terrific start to 2019. Thank you everyone for your contribution to our forum.

    Leave a comment:


  • Hammers
    replied
    Happy New Year to all TKNZ.

    I think this one will last through the evening. 48 years young this year I believe.

    Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_20181231_182928.jpg
Views:	0
Size:	71.7 KB
ID:	47705

    Leave a comment:


  • cyma
    replied
    Nice Capt, This Rado will be 51 in the new year Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_8621.JPG
Views:	3
Size:	85.6 KB
ID:	47702

    Leave a comment:


  • captainscarlet1
    started a topic Seeing in the New Year.

    Seeing in the New Year.

    Well it's another year almost at an end. I wondered what timepiece you might be wearing to see the New Year in.
    I will be going with this one. Entering it's 50th year in 2019, my 6139 6010. Click image for larger version

Name:	DSC04044.JPG
Views:	2
Size:	116.6 KB
ID:	47700 Here's wishing you all a very happy, healthy and prosperous new year
Working...
X