Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Watch winding after long short/long term storage

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Watch winding after long short/long term storage

    I was about to head off to the watch shop this morning until....

    You see I have this Bremont Supermarine that I let sit at times for a couple of months, then I wind it up and wear it for a couple of days only for it to stop on me, of course the Manuel says it can sit for 42 hours, but that wrist movement should keep it fully wound, well I am getting a tad wound with it stopping on me.

    I was going to take it to the watch shop to get it looked at, until this morning.

    I changed watches after the Bremont stopped on Friday, I grabbed my Breitling Skyracer, gave it a wind and wore it over the weekend, I took it off yesterday about 11.00am and this morning I found it had died also.

    Can it be that if these watches have been sat for any length of time they need winding a couple of times within a 24 hour period before the natural wrist movement kicks in enabling them to kick on with accurate time keeping.....????

  • #2
    others will chime in, im sure. my understanding and experience is... yes, fully wound most movements will take 37-42hr to wind down if left unattended.

    an easy way to test reserve is below:

    1. set the watch in question to midnight on the 31st in the date window (so just as it clicks over.
    2. fully wind watch, normally this is around 40 turns on the crown. you will feel a faint clicking when it is fully would as the mechanism clutches to prevent overwind (you won't break anything)
    3. sit watch in box and ignore, as it runs down the hours will pass and after 24hrs it will change date, letting you know it made it 1day.
    4. i normally start the test in the morning on an hour 6-7-8am
    5. when you check next morning you can confirm 24hr reserve then when you come home you can confirm 36hrs (or less if its stopped)
    6. next morning the watch will have stopped and you can just could up the hours since the last evening check and you have your reserve.

    added to this it needs to be noted most movements need to be active to hold their charge, if you fully wind then sit at a desk for 10hr, drive home then sit in front of the telly for 4hrs then watch off for bed it is highly unlikely that the watch is getting enough movement to maintain its full/near full reserve.

    and a last point, with some older watches (some folks say all watches) before you start to wind the mechanism give the watch a few gentle shakes until it is moving under its own steam. this apparently generates less stress on the internals when you come to manually wind via the crown.

    if you check all the above and its low reserve for sure then a service may be in order.

    hope this helps.
    “Strong people are harder to kill than weak people and more useful in general.”


    Despite having the numbers, there is the crazy man in the mountains that none of the tribes will go near!
    Always aim to be that man.

    Comment


    • #3
      Interesting post... now I also have a Bremomt S500. Love it bar one thing, it never seems to get a full 42 hour wind! So I can sympathise. Have actually wondered if the mods Bremont make to the base movement (different winding rotor weight?) impact winding and run time. I’ve never tested it as DW states above but I will now. Note to as DW states, sitting at a desk on a PC does not wind a watch. I have that issue as well. Maybe why I’ve let the odd quartz into the safe.

      Comment


      • #4
        it's an interesting topic as the variables are many. when the OP states "i wind it up" does he wind to full? or until second hand starts moving? we all have watches that need 15-20 winds to start and others that act like millwall fans and kick off if you look at them funny. then you need to think about bi-directional, uni-directional, rotor bearing design (easy of swing) watch position - flat, vertical, angle, all these create small variations in efficiency. your own lifestyle, office or site based, active all day or sedentary. and we haven't even started on the construction materials!
        an interesting wee experiment for any walkers out there...

        1. pick a watch with a power indicator on dial
        2. shake it until it comes to life
        3. get it on your wrist and start walking
        4. see how far you have to go to fill the reserve if indeed it starts to fill (plenty of movements will need you to wing to 1/4-1/3 before they can maintain a credit in the momentum/inertia war)
        5. you may be surprised with some "quality" movements so take sandwiches.

        my most consistent watch movement is my 7750 in the guinand but i think it keeps its charge so well do to the good old wobble 1 arm swing is about 5 full rotations when the rotor starts moving your arm for you
        “Strong people are harder to kill than weak people and more useful in general.”


        Despite having the numbers, there is the crazy man in the mountains that none of the tribes will go near!
        Always aim to be that man.

        Comment


        • Sarbie
          Sarbie commented
          Editing a comment
          great...now youve made me want to get a watch with a power reserve! These are the kind of tests i love to do. This one is testing your watches power reserve and your own laziness.

      • #5
        Wind Autos till you hear the noise of the winding change, wind them close to your ear... and when the noise changes that means they're fully wound... probably take ~30-40 winds from flat, depending on winding technique.

        Now simply place the Auto's on a desk, and leaving them otherwise alone, check how long do they actually go for, this is the only way to tell actual Power Reserve (that I know of).

        -------


        Like DW says, usefully, there can be a lot of variables.. a relatively sedentary life, in front of the TV/PC, driving to ones office desk etc has proved and well may be insufficient to keep an Auto fully wound.

        If your Auto isn't getting fully wound each day it's timekeeping/reserve may be lack lustre... so you may need to give it a few winds or (preferably) gently waggle your wrist about a bit more than you might otherwise, this'd probably do it.


        Click image for larger version  Name:	images?q=tbn:ANd9GcQhnIYF2Tzs8gvaiOSMRD21dJ5_wN5oHkq04pZRnhnHx7NIatMD.png Views:	1 Size:	7.2 KB ID:	50373

        Harlan
        Timekeeper Watch Club
        Auckland, New Zealand, Pacific Ocean, Earth

        Comment


        • #6
          Members have given excellent inputs here, and I’m very thankful to see that

          Originally posted by ghj View Post
          ...I wind it up and wear it for a couple of days only for it to stop on me...
          The OP hasn’t yet responded, but I hope the problem has been solved. It does should look to me like the movements in the OP’s watch was not sufficiently wound. I agree with every advice given by deerworrier and Harlan, so very little to add. As you further your watch journey, you’ll find three main types of mechanical movements taking residence in your watch box, and you’ll need to start them up slightly different.

          Manual-Winding movements requires you to wind the movement until the mainspring is almost fully-wound, the number of turns of the crown for each individual movement can differ. You can over-wind and cause damage to this type of movement, so care must be taken to wind only until you feel a significant increase in tension, then stop. This is usually at least 20 turns, but don’t go by the numbers, but by how the crown feels. You’ll need to learn to get this right as manual-winds will not self-wind, so it’s essential to get every ounce of power reserve available.

          Automatic Self-Winding with Auxiliary Hand-Winding is like your Breitling and Bremont. You are right in your understanding that your “wrist movement should keep it” wound. However, this is provided that the mainspring is fully-wound to begin with. Here again, the number of turns of the crown varies, but usually 30-40 turns. On the Seiko Cal 6R15, I turn it 55 times.

          Lastly, Automatic Self-Winding without Auxiliary Hand-Wind, like on current Seiko Cal 7S26, Orient 469 Series, as well as most vintage Seiko and Orient Automatics. You’ll need to give these sufficient power reserve by swinging the watch, face horizontal to the ground, in an arc. Seiko recommends doing this for 30 seconds, but I recommend counting 400 swings. This bring the mainspring to near fully-wound state. It does take a little time and effort, but will reward you with a better ownership experience, trust me.

          Why the fuss over the fully-wound vs just-shake-and-wear?

          ...Well, many of us here pay a lot of money for mechanical movements of higher grades, capable of higher performance, i.e. superior accuracy and precision. In horology, the mainspring's state of wound affects isochronism of the movement, and mechanical calibers are designed to perform best when the mainspring is at least 50% wound. Knowing this fact is akin to understanding the torque curve of your car’s engine, and simplistically, the state of wound can be compared to the engine’s revolution (RPM). To access optimal torque (precision), the engine’s rev must reach a certain range.

          So, whether you’ve spent a lot of money to get that performance “engine”, or you’ve horned your knowledge/skill/luck to land yourself a vintage high-grade “engine” for very little outlay, it is crucial to know how to get the best out of it.

          On the instruments we entrust to pace our lives, to bear witness to our days, and to be the keepers of the most precious thing we have... time.

          Comment


          • #7
            1 reason not to like great big fat enormous crowns, as they enable the winder to place a lot more force to the crown stem and then onward into the watches innards.

            Originally posted by Don View Post
            Manual-Windingmovements requires you to wind the movement until the mainspring is almost fully-wound, the number of turns of the crown for each individual movement can differ. You can over-wind and cause damage to this type of movement, so care must be taken to wind only until you feel a significant increase in tension, then stop.


            Before someone says it, 'yes, a very few clever calibres aim to, and achieve, in offering a very flat flat torque curve, i.e. maintaining output right to the last drop, or er, unwinding'.

            Originally posted by Don View Post
            the mainspring's state of wound affects isochronismof the movement, and mechanical calibers are designed to perform best when the mainspring is at least 50% wound. Knowing this fact is akin to understanding the torque curve of your car’s engine, and simplistically, the state of wound can be compared to the engine’s revolution (RPM). To access optimal torque (precision), the engine’s rev must reach a certain range.
            PS: OP's a bit busy at the moment, probably not been online for a bit, will make sure he knows about the replies
            Harlan
            Timekeeper Watch Club
            Auckland, New Zealand, Pacific Ocean, Earth

            Comment


            • #8
              Hi Guys taken all the advice on board and am wearing my Bremont without it stopping as it had been in the past, also managed to keep my hand in my pocket as a result of this feedback coz I was heading ti watch shop to get them to check it out for me...so huge thank you for amazing replies !

              Comment

              Working...
              X