Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Khronographos Gonia.

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Khronographos Gonia.

    I’m not sure we have a thread about chronographs in general so I thought I would start one. Ever since I was a child, if I saw a watch with more than one knob on the side of it I was fascinated to find out what the tiny buttons did. Eventually I found out that invariably the watch incorporated a stop watch to time events etc. I’ve had a fascination with them ever since and have quite a few.

    I know there are some stonking chrono’s in the hands of some of our esteemed members.

    So if you have a Chronograph, be it humble, or maybe even a 1816 Louis Moinet example or indeed anything in between, I (and I’m sure others) would love to see them and perhaps learn something too if you care to write a short bio about them (doesn’t have to be technical) And one at a time please, if you have drawers full.

    I thought I would start with this Seiko 7t32. I bought this as a beater, but didn’t have the heart to ruin it.

    Click image for larger version

Name:	02A9E96E-F222-4B12-9691-6287A63F142C.jpeg
Views:	193
Size:	126.9 KB
ID:	56315



    Preparation and planning prevent piss poor performance

  • #2
    Oooo me me me me you will love my one CS1 this is the 2014 SAMSUNG GALAXY GEAR S

    Worlds 1st Stand Alone Wrist Born Chronograph Mobile Phone

    Remember, buttons don't have to be 'on the sides'

    Click image for larger version  Name:	SAMSUNG GALAXY GEAR S.jpeg Views:	0 Size:	81.4 KB ID:	56317

    Embellissements:

    Power Support display cover protector (Made in Japan)
    Amour-Lite Carbon case + déployante cover protector (Made in USA)
    Harlan
    Timekeeper Watch Club
    New Zealand, Pacific Ocean, Earth

    Comment


    • captainscarlet1
      captainscarlet1 commented
      Editing a comment
      Malakas lol.

    • harlansmart
      harlansmart commented
      Editing a comment
      But stop, wait, consider the complications it is capable of or capable of appearing to be capable of, including, but not exclusively:

      power reserve, 50' pressure resistance, date, 24h time, constant seconds, day, step count, analogue display, notifications indicator, 3G cellular, heart rate monitor, year, toasted sandwich maker, perpetual calendar, 2nd TZ, dual time, tourbillon appearance, quartz display, wi-fi, blue-tooth 4.1, GPS, World Time, GPRS, 2G Cellular, multiple alarm capability,

      and thats just scratching the surface so does that REALLY = 'Malakas'?

    • captainscarlet1
      captainscarlet1 commented
      Editing a comment
      My cooker has a few of those functions......but it’s still a cooker lol.

  • #3
    Can I play..... Seiko 5719. Manual wind single pusher chronograph for 1964 Olympics.

    Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_20200112_181109.jpg
Views:	168
Size:	128.4 KB
ID:	56324
    'Beauty is in the eye of the beholder' - but lets face it some people have better eyesight than others!

    Comment


    • harlansmart
      harlansmart commented
      Editing a comment
      A very precious chrono indeed.

  • #4
    And some borrowed blurb with background info.

    When Seiko set out to design Japan’s first wristwatch chronograph, its goal was to produce a watch that was as much status symbol as timing device. Suwa Seikosha, i.e., Seiko’s factory in the city of Suwa, developed the watch, which was launched in time for the 1964 Summer Olympics. It was powered by the 12-ligne, hand-wound Caliber 5719. The salient features of this 6.1-mm-thick movement included a single button to trigger the chronograph’s functions, horizontal coupling, and a column wheel to control the start, stop and return-to-zero functions. The balance was paced at 5.5 hertz, or 39,600 vph. With the chronograph mechanism switched on, the movement would run for 38 hours. The case was made of steel and was 38.2 mm in diameter and 11.2 mm thick.
    Seiko 5719 Caliber

    The watch had no elapsed-time counter, so Seiko equipped it with a rotating bezel calibrated in 1-minute increments. To measure an interval longer than 1 minute, the user started the chronograph and then rotated the bezel until the tip of the large triangle was directly opposite the tip of the minutes hand. After he stopped the chronograph at the end of the interval, he read the elapsed minutes using the rotating bezel and the elapsed seconds using the regular dial. The problem with this first chronograph series was that the bezel had a tendency to break. Seiko rectified this by replacing the fragile bezel with a sturdy, steel one.
    'Beauty is in the eye of the beholder' - but lets face it some people have better eyesight than others!

    Comment


    • harlansmart
      harlansmart commented
      Editing a comment
      SEIKO = CHRONO KING

      And who else constantly invents whole new type of moments etc ?

      It is hard to challenge the statement, 'SEIKO Is the Master Watch Marque.'

  • #5
    My favourite, Butcherer Valijoux 7733 17 Jewel

    Click image for larger version  Name:	IMG_9685.JPG Views:	20 Size:	137.9 KB ID:	56332
    'Man Invented time, Cyma Perfected it.'

    Comment


  • #6
    Like this to,, just need genuine bracelet for it. That's my 2 bobs worth

    Click image for larger version  Name:	IMG_9686.JPG Views:	15 Size:	134.7 KB ID:	56334
    'Man Invented time, Cyma Perfected it.'

    Comment


    • #7
      Why tell the whole story when someone else has already started it off for you? ...I’m going to continue my story from where Hammers left off in the forth post.

      1964 was an epic year for Japan, with Seiko clearly there to make it happen with their in-house manual-winding chronograph Cal. 5719 in Hammers’ piece. Note from the movement photo that the 5719 is a column-wheel controlled chronograph. Why is this important? Because it alludes to the grade of a chronograph movement.

      Back in 1964, there were no CAD/CAM, and while all other components inside the movement could be stamped out inexpensively, the column wheel still required a lot of handcrafting. This made column-wheel chronographs expensive movements, and this was so throughout most of the 20th Century. Another thing about the mid-1960s was that all chronographs were hand-winding. The automatic self-winding chronograph was, in 1964, still one of the greatest unresolved horological paradigm.





      Toward the end of the 1960s, the Swiss were the first to set out to accomplish the unaccomplishable, and pursued the automatic chronograph. From the success of the hand-wind 5719, Seiko wanted to establish themselves as a manufacturer of high-end, as good as the Swiss, Seiko entered the race to be the first to offer an automatic chronograph. Within a couple of months of Basel 1969, Seiko released the Automatic Chronograph Cal. 6139, which utilized a new coupling system, developed and patented by Seiko, for engaging the chronograph, such that backlash is eliminated.

      It was a revolutionary idea—the World’s First fully-integrated automatic chronograph with a vertical clutch mechanism. And while Seiko 6139 may not have been the first to be announced, it was indeed the first to be available to the public word-wide by August 1969, beating both the Zenith El Primero and the Calibre 11/Chronomatic to the stores. The Seiko Cal. 6139 (chronograph, 60 sec, 30 min) and its sibling, Cal. 6138 (chronograph, 60 sec, 30 min, 12 hr, released 1970), were part of the 61 Series, manufactured by Suwa Seikosha.





      In 2000, 31 years after the first automatic chronograph with vertical clutch was pioneered by Seiko, Rolex successfully developed their first chronograph movement for the Rolex Daytona, the Cal. 4130. The 4130 adopted Seiko’s automatic chronograph’s architecture, the vertical clutch. In the past two decades, other Swiss high-end brands have also turned to the same clutch system that drove the original Cal. 6138/6139. Patek Philippe (Calibre 28-520 series), Jaeger-LeCoultre (Calibre 752), and Piaget (Cal 880P) are just to name a few. The vertical clutch, introduced by Seiko, has become a major trend in high-end mechanical chronograph in the 21st Century.


      SPECIFICATIONS

      MOVEMENT: SEIKO Automatic Cal 6138B, 21 Jewels, 21’600 A/hr, Column-wheel controlled bi-compax chronograph (60s / 30m / 12h), QuickSet Day/Date, Auxiliary manual-winding, Power reserve of 45 hours
      CASE: Stainless steel (diameter: 44 mm excl. crown, thickness: 14 mm, lug-width: 19 mm), Rotating slide rule bezel, Screw-in case back
      CRYSTAL: Acrylic
      DIAL: Black with luminous indices, hour, and minute hands
      BRACELET: Stainless steel, solid outer links
      WATER RESISTANCE: 70 m
      MANUFACTURED: In Japan, March 1975






      Seiko themselves have now returned to the production of automatic chronograph movements. The technology trail-blazed by Cal. 6139/6138 in 1969 and 1970 now lives on in the Automatic Chronograph 8R Series and the Spring Drive Chronograph 9R Series. These equip the Brightz Pheonix, as well as the chronographs in the Ananta and Grand Seiko lines. Seiko, while exploring and expanding the boundaries of automatic chronograph, is very much in touch with its horological legacy.

      As they say, you only start from a clean sheet if you have nothing worth keeping. The mile-stone that is the Cal. 6139/8 provided the perfect starting point and inspiration for the 9R Series, whose winding rotor is clearly shaped to pay homage to a true classic.



      On the instruments we entrust to pace our lives, to bear witness to our days, and to be the keepers of the most precious thing we have... time.

      Comment


      • Hammers
        Hammers commented
        Editing a comment
        Because I knew you would tell the rest of the story better than I could....

      • harlansmart
        harlansmart commented
        Editing a comment
        Thanks a lot Don, like Hammers says lol

    • #8
      Great to see some awesome pieces so far. Hammers 5719 is always marvelous to see. I almost bought one about a year ago in an antique shop in Christchurch. (It May still be there, unless the owners estate was sold in it’s entirety). CYMA’s Bucherer and 6138 are particularly fine pieces too.

      Thankyou Don for the great timeline of the Seiko chronograph story. (I do wonder if Pierce quietly kick themselves) And your 6138 must be quite a scarce beast to see in the wild.

      So, in the name of continuity. Here is my 1969 6139.

      Click image for larger version

Name:	AE97273D-5178-4F30-B3B9-C6E632DD41A3.jpeg
Views:	154
Size:	133.8 KB
ID:	56356

      Click image for larger version

Name:	5E2F0E9F-2935-44D5-BEC9-EB7FDBC80339.jpeg
Views:	152
Size:	113.4 KB
ID:	56357 Lots more to unearth, so keep em coming.
      Preparation and planning prevent piss poor performance

      Comment


      • Don
        Don commented
        Editing a comment
        Such well-preserved dial and hands for a piece of this age, Captain... My 6138-7000 Slide Rule is, in the scheme of things, rare, but there are many rarer vintage Seiko chrono, like Hammers' hand-wind Chronograph 5719, which is considered very rare. Another of our member, 246, owns a number of very rare models from the 6138 and 7000 Series.

    • #9
      Click image for larger version

Name:	
Views:	0
Size:	55.3 KB
ID:	56435 Click image for larger version

Name:	
Views:	0
Size:	55.9 KB
ID:	56436 Click image for larger version

Name:	
Views:	0
Size:	137.7 KB
ID:	56437 Click image for larger version

Name:	
Views:	0
Size:	308.7 KB
ID:	56438 Hi guys, hopefully i have selected the correct information, having got my last one about the Strela chronograph incorrect!!!!!!

      below, is the pride and joy of my Russian watch collection, an OKEAH, (Ocean)....heres the spiel from the interthingy......

      Introduced in the 1970's but not generally available until 1983, Calibre 3133 includes elements of earlier Venus movements, notably the Venus 150, Venus 188, and Valjoux 7734. It is not a copy or clone of these movements, but Poljot did purchase machinery and tooling and adapt elements of these calibres into the evolving 3133 design.
      The Poljot 3133 is a cam controlled chronograph operating at 21,600 A/h. It has a 30 minute counter at 3:00, a small seconds dial at 9:00, and a central sweep seconds counter along with the hour and minute hands. A date window is located at 6:00. Two buttons control the chronograph functions: The 2:00 pusher for starting and stopping the chronograph, and the 4:00 pusher to reset the seconds and minute counters. Calibre 3133 is nominally a 23 jewel movement, but several jewels are used on both sides, allowing some to claim 31 jewels.


      The inscription on the back of the watch reads "To B.A. Kolizaev from the comrades in arms, military unit 27177 July 1985"......i have four 3133s in my collection
      While i'm not as good as i once was.....i'm as good once as i ever was.......!

      Comment


      • captainscarlet1
        captainscarlet1 commented
        Editing a comment
        So Scouser, it’s entirely your fault that for the first time ever, I’ve started looking for a Russian chronograph.
        Very nice indeed.

    • #10
      Originally posted by Scouser View Post

      below, is the pride and joy of my Russian watch collection, an OKEAH, (Ocean)....heres the spiel from the interthingy......
      The OKEAHs are so cool, as are the civilian-market Poljots like your one with the black dial. Really unique chronographs and I hope to have one someday, if the Russian forum on WUS is anything to go by the 3133s have quite a fan base though, so hopefully there are still some examples on the market in a few years!


      G

      Comment


      • Scouser
        Scouser commented
        Editing a comment
        Cheers Gauss, im also a member of the Russian forum on WUS.....same username....(still cant get my photos the correct way up....very frustrating)...i got mine from a forum member from the Ukraine, there getting more and more expensive, and loads of frankens about

    • #11
      Originally posted by Scouser View Post
      Click image for larger version

Name:	
Views:	0
Size:	55.3 KB
ID:	56435 Click image for larger version

Name:	
Views:	0
Size:	55.9 KB
ID:	56436 Click image for larger version

Name:	
Views:	0
Size:	137.7 KB
ID:	56437 Click image for larger version

Name:	
Views:	0
Size:	308.7 KB
ID:	56438 Hi guys, hopefully i have selected the correct information, having got my last one about the Strela chronograph incorrect!!!!!!

      below, is the pride and joy of my Russian watch collection, an OKEAH, (Ocean)....heres the spiel from the interthingy......

      Introduced in the 1970's but not generally available until 1983, Calibre 3133 includes elements of earlier Venus movements, notably the Venus 150, Venus 188, and Valjoux 7734. It is not a copy or clone of these movements, but Poljot did purchase machinery and tooling and adapt elements of these calibres into the evolving 3133 design.
      The Poljot 3133 is a cam controlled chronograph operating at 21,600 A/h. It has a 30 minute counter at 3:00, a small seconds dial at 9:00, and a central sweep seconds counter along with the hour and minute hands. A date window is located at 6:00. Two buttons control the chronograph functions: The 2:00 pusher for starting and stopping the chronograph, and the 4:00 pusher to reset the seconds and minute counters. Calibre 3133 is nominally a 23 jewel movement, but several jewels are used on both sides, allowing some to claim 31 jewels...

      Excellent post, Scouser! ...Geez, I am envious of your collection, and don’t count it against you in any way for getting anything “incorrect”. Really, one cannot say anything is incorrect unless one knows what is correct, and that is something to celebrate for any enthusiast ...I’m with Gauss, in agreement, that these are cool...liberating so, in fact!

      While I can’t claim to know the full story on the Poljot 3133—so don’t take my version of the story as gospel—I can add bits that I think are credible to what the interthingy (which are just made up of a variety of peoplethingies, as you know) says. This is useful in making sense of the characters in your story—Venus, Valjoux, and Poljot—and not a correction, because what you have is already correct. As with everything, narrative gives meaning, and I hope that some of what is to follow might add a little to how much you already appreciate these watches.

      Fabrique d'Ebauches Venus SA was a movement manufacturer, a specialist in chronograph calibers, based in Moutier, Switzerland, between 1940 and the mid-1960s. Venus was one of three chronograph specialists under Ebauches SA, the entity that merged to become today’s ETA. While they were in operation, Venus produced a number of different variants of chronograph modules, one of which was the Venus 188 Series, introduced in 1948. The thing that made the Venus 188 different from most other chronographs of the 1950s was that Venus used a cam switching technique instead of the traditional column-wheel chronograph movements of other manual-winding chronos. This lever/cam-actuated design was more economical to fabricate than the classic column-wheel.

      The decade that followed saw a chronograph market that became increasingly competitive, and what Venus had going in their 188 suddenly became an attractive asset. So, when Venus ended its operation in 1967, another chronograph specialist under Ebauches SA –Valjoux SA—readily acquired the former, with the intent to continue the manufacturing of the Venus 188 series. Valjoux reintroduced the Venus 188 manual-winding cam-switching chrono, with 17 jewels and beating at 18,000 A/hr, as the Valjoux 7730. Then in 1969, the 7730 was completely redesigned, giving birth to the hand-winding chronograph Valjoux 7733 (see a Date version here… https://www.timekeeper.co.nz/forum/w...D-valjoux-7734)

      As everyone following the story so far knows, 1969 was not the best of time to debut a manual-wound chrono! One word was in the mind of everyone in the chronograph world at the time, and that word was “automatic”. Although Valjoux missed out on joining the race for the First Automatic Chronograph, the modification work they made to arrive at the 7733 resulted in more cost effective production, and enabled Valjoux to develop their first automatic self-winding chronograph movement, the now-ubiquitous Valjoux 7750 (see https://www.timekeeper.co.nz/forum/w...75x-case-study). The year was 1974.

      It would be fair to say that, with the release of the 7750 automatic chronograph, Valjoux saw little future with what they saw as outdated manual-wind 7733. It was in this same year, 1974, that Ebauches SA, through Valjoux, sold 7733’s machinery to the Soviet, who were already manufacturing a clone of an earlier Venus 150 (Poljot Cal 3017 “Strela”)--this is where it ties in to your Poljot 3017 Strela ...It was only after the Russian obtained the tooling at the initial, in 1974, that modifications and improvements were made to the base 7733, not sometime later and added somehow to a pre-existing Poljot 3133, as the internet source you quoted seem to suggest.

      The modified caliber first seen service two years later, in 1976, in the guise of the Poljot Cal. 31659, which was, at the time, exclusive to the Soviet Navy. The navy chronograph was named the OKEAH, which helps makes sense of why the word “ocean” was chosen. Later versions went to the Soviet Air Force inside the Sturmanskie. It was nearly a decade later—perhaps the 1983 that you quote—did Poljot start producing a civilian version, the Poljot 3133. The 3133 is a non-hacking version of the 31659.

      While the Poljot 3133 can be found in many types of Poljot and under other Russian brands, I think that those that carry the OKEAH name are the best historical resonance of how the Poljot 3133 is a descendant of the original 1976 Poljot 31659. For me personally, one particular old Poljot 3133 was both my very first mechanical chronograph and my first hand-winder. In the 1990s, I was a 19 years old student who was barely making ends meet from what I made from casual jobs, but was already swallowed by the love for mechanical watches—just didn’t have the money to buy them. I found a used 3133 chronograph in at local flea market, at a price that was affordable to me.

      In those days before the Internet, books offered very limited info on Poljot, and all I knew was that it was Russian with a movement based on a Swiss manual-wind chronograph. While I no longer have that watch—its mainspring broke, and the whole thing now long lost—Poljot chronographs will always hold that special place in my memory. Very happy to see when someone appreciates them. Thank you for sharing, Scouser.
      On the instruments we entrust to pace our lives, to bear witness to our days, and to be the keepers of the most precious thing we have... time.

      Comment


      • captainscarlet1
        captainscarlet1 commented
        Editing a comment
        Thanks for continuing to take the time to pen these replies Don. No easy task.

    • #12
      Wow Don, ive been 3 years on the WUS Russian website and thats the most in depth understanding i have on this movement,

      i cannot 'afford' to have a watch collection (my wife see's to that) but i can afford to buy these Soviet era timepieces when i get the price im acceptable with!

      its the historical element (space, armed forces) of the watches that gave me the attraction, real ice breakers at any function.....big thanks for your reply

      you never know you might find it down the back of your sofa one day!!!!!!
      While i'm not as good as i once was.....i'm as good once as i ever was.......!

      Comment


      • Don
        Don commented
        Editing a comment
        Thank you for your comment, Scouser. Made it all worthwhile, and made my day

    • #13
      Seeing that it has been a few months since the last edition was made to this Chronograph thread, I thought I’d bring it back up as there are still heaps of chronos on Timekeeper that has yet to be added. I’ll start off by adding another, though cheating a little in using my Post#7, above, as reference. The 6138-7000 Slide Rule was, in many ways, a good representative of sports watches of the 1970s, an era when post-war ideals that called for elegance in fashion became less dominant. In its place, bold styling, bright colours, and influence from aviation was seen in watches like the Slide Rule.

      We, of course, know that the -7000 was just one of many models of the Seiko Chronograph Cal. 6138 throughout these movements’ nine year production life. However, these models were not all manufactured and sold simultaneously all at once, and few were actually made throughout the entire 9-year period—the 6138-001x “Yachtman”/”UFO” was one (and possibly only) version that was so. In the Japanese Domestic Market of the early-1970s, Seiko even divided the 6138 Chronograph into two distinct groups.



      Image scan from 1974 Seiko Catalog (Japan Domestic Market)


      One group, as seen above, was made up of traditional sports watches, like those of the 60s, with plain, simple, and uncluttered aesthetics. In Japan, these 6138s were equipped with the flagship caliber 6138B 23-Jewels, as denoted on their dials, and were essentially more upmarket versions of the JDM 6138s. The other group was bold in design and colour, youthful, sometimes inspired by the space age or rock star looks. They were sold in Japan as the “5 Sports Speed-Timer” collection of watches.

      By 1978, the final year that Seiko Japan offered Automatic Chronographs, the Speed-Timer had been integrated into the general JDM range. More or less, the trendy 70s won



      Image scan from the 1970 Seiko Catalog (International)


      Outside of Japan, all 6138s—the reserved and the bold—were sold without any differentiation, and all were designated simply as “Automatic Chronograph”. However, the International Market did not get every variant of 6138 available in Japan, and for the 6138-300x “Jumbo”, only 21 jewel movements were sold overseas. This made the 6138-300x the only 6138 case reference that was available in both the 21 and range-topping 23 jewels variants. Unlike the rarer Slide Rule, a production span of approximately seven years (1970-1977) makes the 6138 “Jumbo” relatively common today, among vintage Seiko chronographs—don’t let any seller tell you otherwise, the Jumbo is not rare.

      However, a little known fact is that the -300x was also the only 6138 case reference to have a case design change mid-production, around 1974. The change was subtle, but resulted in two similar but different cases, different Hardlex crystals, and different systems in fitting the crystal and bezel to rest of the case. Here is a first generation Jumbo, a 6138-3000 from 1972 that I owned many years ago, and one of six Jumbo that I’ve had over the last decade plus.





      This next one is my current 6138-3002 from 1977, possibly their final year of production. There were, however, other 6138 models that were made well into 1978 and 79, e.g. 6138-001x “UFO”, 6138-004x “Bullhead”, and 6138-003x “Kakume”, but I’ve yet to see a later date -300x. This specimen is all original, apart from the replacement straps, a custom-made 19mm set for this Seiko. Can you spot the differences between the two versions?










      On the instruments we entrust to pace our lives, to bear witness to our days, and to be the keepers of the most precious thing we have... time.

      Comment

      Working...
      X