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Brushed stainless steel buffing

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  • Brushed stainless steel buffing

    What do you use for buffing out marks on brushed stainless steel (e.g. watch bracelets)?

    A few overseas websites I’ve looked at prefer micron polishing cloths over such 'equipment' as Scotch pads and nail buffers, but I was wondering what local knowledge might recommend. Any suggestions gratefully received

  • #2
    There is this ugly clapped out machine over in the western hills ....It's called Harlan it runs on beer, single malt whisky and very fine wine and although some of the freshness of youth is gone it still does an amazing job evrything considered
    I don't suffer from insanity, I enjoy every minute of it.

    Nothing is fool-proof to a sufficiently talented fool.

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    • #3
      I would say it depends how deep it is firstly. I have had some success in the past working a scotch pad in the same direction of the grain to bring back the brushed look on desk diving marks. Not deep though. The brushed look is basically a lot of scratches anyway. You would have to be careful not to "polish" it though. In my case the watch was disassembled so I used the scotch pad all over the case to even up the look. Before I tried mine I googled it and read of people using sand papers, flap wheels and metal polishes etc... My result didn't look perfect to my eye but the person who bought it thought it looked great. I don't think you would get a deeper scratch out without redoing the whole case. I will be interested to learn of other peoples experiences though. P.S. I should mention the scotch pad I used was from a panel beater, its grey and comes in a big roll. They use it to key a surface for blending in paint.

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      • #4
        I had this very thought, and wanted to do it on the cheap but "sort of" do it right. I needed a Seiko clasp, but didn't want to pay $30USD for one. I got this one off an older watch I had laying about, but it was really scratched. From memory there were only a couple of deep scratches.


        Here's my first attempt at polishing a Seiko clasp

        Before: Lots of desk diver type swirlies


        Before and After: Sorry about the brightness, but the new clasp is MUCH shinier afterwards and it effected the exposure!


        The tool: The offending piece of kit, cost $28 and AutoSol metal polish was $12


        The bits: The felt tip gets it nice and smooth, and the green tip with metal flake gets the NICE brushed finish


        The finished product: Keep the mirror finish on the sides, and brush the tops - just like the factory


        Remember:
        Wear eye protection (splatters of autosol laced with metal filings are NOT nice!) and only use soft heads, NEVER a head stiffer than your fingernail or it'll CUT into the metal! Also, be mindful of the metal flakes on the used heads - so don't attempt to polish a crystal with a used head! Slow and steady wins the race, and go with the grain.


        Cheers,
        Romeo
          [br]
        1. \"Luck is merely preparation meeting an opportunity\"
        2. [br]

        [br]
          [br]
        1. My WAYWOF photo archive
        2. [br]

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        • #5
          Wow you mean I dont have to keep hand-sanding
          I got bored one night: 1200grit + xxx grade wire wool for the "brushed" part and 2000grit for the "polished"
          Im sure there will be many who cringe at the indignity offered to this helpless Sawtooth bracelet ops:
          Not entirely bad though... bit tricky to keep all the "brushes" going exactly parallel - only recommended for people with way too much time on their hands or any Amish among us who are forbidden to use power tools... (Hang on, what are they gonna be doing on a website anyway... :D )


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          My karma ran over your dogma

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          • #6

            The tool: The offending piece of kit, cost $28 and AutoSol metal polish was $12

            Cheers,
            Romeo
            Actually good value for $28 mate.
            And when its done its dash the Case could be turned into a watch display / storage case. 8-) 8-)
            I'd buy it for that reason alone . Looks like you could store at least 6 watches comfortably in there :D

            think I'll go and get one for my everyday watches , But will still send the expensive watches and the tricky bracelets up to the H-Man for polishing :thumbup:
            Rest easy Matty , My best Mate and Son

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            • #7
              Thanks for all of the advice. I don't have any particularly deep gouges or scrapes to wrestle with, but I'm watching the swirls slowly gather on a couple of bracelets and am thinking of what to do in the future. In fact lately I've been thinking of putting any new watches on a Nato straight away, which may be a slight over reaction or could just be practical.
              I'm not sure what option I'll go with, but Romeo your transformation is quite literally brilliant. Very impressive!

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