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Need help with my grandfathers tissot seastar

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  • Need help with my grandfathers tissot seastar

    Hi I recently inherited my grandfathers watch I think it's a 1970s seastar.
    the band was broken and the top has been replaced with another watches part I wanted to find an original band or maybe look at restoring it any help with some sites or recommendations would be greatly appreciated
    thankyou in advance

  • #2

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    • #3
      Welcome Benjabs1995,

      I'm no expert on this sort of thing, but others are likely to chime in over time - particularly if you can load some more pix?


      Click image for larger version

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      Harlan
      Timekeeper Watch Club
      Auckland, New Zealand, Pacific Ocean, Earth

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      • #4

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        • #5
          Here's some more photos

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          • #6
            Hi Benjabs and welcome. Could you give us some dimensions of the correct 'end link'? The part that fits between the lugs of the watch and the gap that accepts the bracelet may do for starters. Are there any numbers stamped on it? From what I can see, you need a 'straight end link'. Is the clasp actually broken or does it just need a new pin (spring bar) to re attach it?
            Preparation and planning prevent piss poor performance

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            • #7
              If you can find out the model number/reference that should then assist greatly in finding parts for the bracelet, which are likely to be available at a low price on ebay.

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              • #8
                Hi thankyou very much. I will have a look and see what the dimensions are and get back to you tomorrow. The clasp just needs a new pin to be fixed so that is no problem at all I can get that done. Does anyone know where I might find the model number on the watch? The only number I could see was that one I posted on the band itself.

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                • #9
                  It appears that the bracelet reference number is on the inside of the clasp - as per the photo of the clasp. Try searching ebay with that number.

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                  • #10
                    Harry beat me to it, but I have my Dad’s old Tissot Seastar that came with what looked like an Argos random bracelet on it.

                    Being a one watch man, two decades later the original bracelet was long gone and the watch was and still is looking decidedly worn.

                    Took three years of very generic weekly Tissot bracelet searching on eBay to find another original, but well worth the wait.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Benjabs1995 View Post
                      Hi I recently inherited my grandfathers watch I think it's a 1970s seastar.
                      the band was broken and the top has been replaced with another watches part I wanted to find an original band or maybe look at restoring it any help with some sites or recommendations would be greatly appreciated
                      thankyou in advance
                      Hi Benjabs1995, and thank you for sharing with us your grandfather’s Tissot Seastar. You may be new to vintage watches, but what you’re doing right now, i.e. seeking advice from a collector community before doing anything in terms of restoration, is wise beyond your years and experience Too many people seek us out only after they have butchered their vintage piece. Where to start...one thing is that the mismatch bracelet issue will be eventually be an afterthought—not a crucial thing at this point, so just concentrate on the head (the body of the watch) for now. First, you’ll want to know more about what you’ve inherited, as this will not only give you a greater appreciation of the watch itself, but possibly a clearer perspective of its relationship to your grandfather—maybe even to try and see it through his eyes when he wore this watch.

                      You are right that this Tissot is from the 1970s, and I would say, from elements on the dial and style of the screw-in case back, early- to mid-1970s. Next would be to understand how vintage Tissot are appreciated by collectors, because different vintage watches are appreciated or collected for different reasons. In the case of these vintage Gents Tissots, you’ll find that Reference or Model numbers (stamped inside the case back) are close to meaningless. Its only use would be possibly to match up with another specimen you find on-line to reference the validity of the model—again, not really important for these watches. Vintage Tissots are collected based on 1) the era that the watch was manufactured, with those produced during the time the company was part of the Omega-Tissot Group being the more valued, and 2) their movements.

                      Now, I can’t be sure without seeing what movement is inside your watch, but yours may certainly hit on both of the above collector’s value criteria. It may, and I’m no means saying it does without seeing the inside, the in-house Tissot 2481… So, it would pay to visit a nearby watchmaker and ask him/her to help you open the case, and tell you what caliber number is stamped on the movement for educational purposes—he/she may even do it for free. You can then take a photo of the movement (please please use higher resolution on your phone), and the inside of the case back at the same time. We’ll be able to help you more after that

                      A watch journey that also serves the betterment of others is one worth taking.

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