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Omega Seamaster Automatic Vintage Watch (WR0608)

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  • #61
    This is brutal eh, so so so true (and it is often very very costly an error)...

    Most of the so called 'experts & valuers' commit this sin perhaps much more in practice that they might realise (or care to admit to)...

    The number of ridiculously wrong valuations from the so called 'expert valuers' has proven they are not nearly so 'expert' as they might be:


    “I can’t prove this is a fake.”, but nearly everyone in such situation instead say, “This is authentic.”… there is a shocking difference between the two, and most people don’t realize it.

    Harlan
    Timekeeper Watch Club
    Auckland, New Zealand, Pacific Ocean, Earth

    Comment


    • #62
      Originally posted by sjb View Post
      ...
      For the golf ball question the only 2 statements we can rely on to be true are that the seller has a ball and it is indeed painted white (the only way to find out if it is indeed yellow beneath is to purchase the ball and go get your turps, at which point it is too late).
      Excellent, Neil! Sounds like Answer C, “The seller has a painted golf ball, and the paint is white.” ...Hope everyone else got that right too.

      The other part of the question is “how can we apply this to our topic of refinished dials?” ...This is not difficult to think about, really. It means that most buyers, when they read in the description that a watch has a repainted dial (just like our painted golf ball), they often assume that the paint had been applied to what they really want, which is the genuine original dial underneath (yellow golf ball). This logic exercise demonstrates how the claim of it being a yellow golf ball underneath cannot be substantiated, i.e. cannot be verified, and unlike the case of the painted golf ball, we may never be able to find out. No one buys vintage watches to scratch off the dial paint.

      When we are shown this…






      ...and told, the dial is “Original dial, professionally repainted.” (Yellow golf ball, professionally painted white), the only thing that can be proven is the “repainted”. We cannot verify whether 1) the dial is original to the watch, nor 2) the dial is authentic Omega dial... The vast majority of vintage watch buyers, even those who know what “redone dial” means, often take these two as fact... when the only fact is thatwe don’t know.

      Now, imagine if you were a watch refurbisher and you get hold of these two old watches, and you intend to refurbish and sell them. The first is complete, but very worn out condition…






      The other has only a movement and case, no dial.





      What would you do?

      You might say to start with the first complete example, redo the original dial, following my “recipe” in Post# 56 ( https://www.timekeeper.co.nz/forum/w...9851#post39851 ). At the same time, find a compatible old Omega dial for the second watch, and redial said old Omega dial… Well, you could do that with the second watch, but there is an easier and cheaper way.

      Since you’re going to strip every bit of original paint off the old dial anyway, why would you need to find an authentic vintage Omega dial? When these below are available from dial makers in China for around NZ$1.20 each…






      They come in all shape and sizes, with or without Day/Date window. Whatever is printed on them is not important, because you will either glass blast or sand the paint off anyway. Like this…





      Date window when you don't want one? No sweat! Just block it out with steel-filled epoxy... Problem with incompatible dial feet? No worries! Just cut them off, and glue or double-sided tape the dial onto the movement... The buyer will not find out until they take it to a watchmaker, which will be way pass the deadline for filing any PayPal dispute.

      Oh heck! Why do just one, when you can do two, and sell the original Omega dial as spare parts for NZ$80-100 on the international market?

      Use blank Chinese dial for both of your refurbished Omega, and make more money in the end! Indeed, there is a financial incentive for using new blank dials, but no extra money from trying to restore an old Omega dial.

      I’m not implying that ALL refinished dials are done on Chinese blank dials. I’m just saying that we cannot verify either way... Now you know!




      Last edited by Don; 07-03-18, 19:39.
      A watch journey that also serves the betterment of others is one worth taking.

      Comment


      • #63
        My comments were referring to what I thought was wrong with this particular watch rather than an exhaustive list of my considerations when reviewing a watch.

        Comment


        • #64
          Originally posted by Harry View Post
          My comments were referring to what I thought was wrong with this particular watch rather than an exhaustive list of my considerations when reviewing a watch.
          Yes, that’s what I assumed to be the case, Harry ...So, what I attempted to do in my response to you four days ago in Post# 54 (https://www.timekeeper.co.nz/forum/w...9839#post39839) was to extrapolate on what you said—not sure now whether I did a good job of it. As mentioned in the reply to you, I do agree with many of your approaches, thought they were all valid points, so in trying to expand your input, I’m not nullifying the validity of your ideas in any way. This is just purely to be in line with my explanation of the thread in the opening Post# 1, “...what sort of things would one be considering in the process of authenticating this watch. What sort of information would one require?...”

          I was actually waiting for you to either say, “Yes Don, agree—that’s how I do it.” or “That’s not what I meant, and here is a better way...

          The audience that I have in mind for this topic is made up of those new to vintage watches or watch newbies in general, and this group is rather at risk of bad vintage purchases. Like many of us when starting on anything new, they don’t know how much they don’t or should know, and tend to look for short-cuts, the tips-tricks-and-spot-the-mistake types along the line of 10 Signs that She Secretly Likes You or 5 Signs Your Partner is Cheating on You. I see too many times something along this line…


          The Pro: There are many things wrong with this watch, 1)… 2)… 3)… 4)….
          The Novice: Thanks heaps! I’ll take note. You’re a great help!
          [ The Novice write down word-for-word 1)… 2)… 3)… 4)…., ...goes to eBay, ...finds a watch he likes, ...applies 1)… 2)… 3)… 4)…., and yes! It passes The Test. Yippee! ...Buys said watch. ]

          The Pro: ...but that’s just a small portion of my exhaustive list of considerations when reviewing a watch.
          The Novice: ...(oh crap!)


          Please take this light-heartedly… not trying to disrespect you in any way.




          A watch journey that also serves the betterment of others is one worth taking.

          Comment


          • #65
            Thoroughly enjoying this thread, so many points to learn. Wish I could engage at a different level but tooooo early for me.


            Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

            Comment


            • #66
              Originally posted by ibrar View Post
              Thoroughly enjoying this thread, so many points to learn. Wish I could engage at a different level but tooooo early for me.

              It’s good to be appreciated, ibrar. Thank you. Let me share a thought with you on the “...tooooo early” part.

              A lot of people use to rely on Watch Out! Authenticate Me, not only our active members and members who primarily just browse, but also watch buyers on TradeMe who aren’t members but visit these pages regularly. This sub-forum of ours had a certain sanctity, was trusted, respected, and revered, not just because it resides on Timekeeper nor because it’s run by some watch nuts. Our whole credibility is based solely on two things.

              1. Competence and the constant and apparent pursuit to improve this competence

              2. Moral Authority—being clear about what we believe in, and importantly, being vocal about what we stand for.


              Even if one is short on expertise or experience, one can speak up about what one thinks is important, what one is willing to fight for. Without people like you who participate in this thread, ibrar, our credibility and, along with it, any reason for continuing Watch Out! Authenticate Me, is annihilated. If we continue to take the trust that others have given us for granted, may be we shouldn't have this sub-forum anymore.

              To quote Elie Wiesel, "Neutrality helps the oppressor, never the victim. Silence encourages the tormentor, never the tormented."
              Last edited by Don; 09-03-18, 11:30.
              A watch journey that also serves the betterment of others is one worth taking.

              Comment


              • #67
                Can't find what I'm looking for as the thread is quite big ,
                So here is my question to you Don.

                I'll use a Seiko 6138-0030 as an example
                eg:
                A person goes out and buys a Seiko 6138-0030,
                Everything on and in the watch is completely 100% original
                Unfortunately the movement is rusty and beyond economical repair .

                So a 100% genuine donor movement gets sourced and replaces the original broken movement .
                Now we have a fully working 6138-0030 which could be sold as a fully original watch and would be hard to detect the movement is a donor.

                Is this watch now classed as a franken because of a movement swap..
                If a seller chose not to disclose the movement swap how do I tell it could be a Donor if it came from an identical 6138-0030
                Rest easy Matty , My best Mate and Son

                Comment


                • #68
                  Originally posted by pedro44 View Post
                  Can't find what I'm looking for as the thread is quite big ,
                  So here is my question to you Don.

                  I'll use a Seiko 6138-0030 as an example
                  eg:
                  A person goes out and buys a Seiko 6138-0030,
                  Everything on and in the watch is completely 100% original
                  Unfortunately the movement is rusty and beyond economical repair .

                  So a 100% genuine donor movement gets sourced and replaces the original broken movement .
                  Now we have a fully working 6138-0030 which could be sold as a fully original watch and would be hard to detect the movement is a donor.

                  Is this watch now classed as a franken because of a movement swap..
                  If a seller chose not to disclose the movement swap how do I tell it could be a Donor if it came from an identical 6138-0030
                  Hi Pete, thanks for that. I know you’re a seasoned watch buyer and quite on the ball about this already, and really appreciate that you’re asking here to help me help the new members. The point that you’ve brought up haven’t been covered yet, so it will be another long post, I’m afraid. I will break this up into two parts, and each part would contribute towards the answer.


                  PART I

                  In Post# 12 (https://www.timekeeper.co.nz/forum/w...9458#post39458), I explained the importance of “Knowing What to Expect”

                  Originally posted by Don View Post
                  ...an experienced authenticator would only start considering a particular specimen only if and only when they know what to expect.

                  Knowing what to expect is made up of two components, both of which are equally important in making an informed purchase. The first—everybody knows—is to know the watch model, i.e. know the history of the model, the variants, Reference, period of production, possible types of movements, case, dial, bracelet, and market value. The second—and this is the killer move—is understanding authenticity issues related to the particular brand and model... i.e. not just authenticity issues in general, but authenticity issue relating to that particular watch.

                  The first reply post in this thread, from our Moderator Stevo_iwc and later supported by Alex, illustrates their awareness of one of the authenticity issues of 1950s-1960s vintage Omega. My reply post to Steve addressed this, and the post directly above this one from Tempus also shows his awareness of an authenticity issue that is found in these vintage Omega, but not found in all vintage watches. These authenticity issues are different across different brands—vintage Rolex, Omega, Breitling chronographs, Girard Perregaux, Eterna, and Seiko, each have their own set of authenticity issues that is not applicable to other makes.

                  The large majority of this thread has indeed been about “Understanding Authenticity” issues relating to Omega Seamaster Automatic of the 1960s, i.e. those of the Mid-500 Series. For those new to vintages, a lot of what you’ve learned so far is specific to these type of watches, and may not be applicable to others, whether vintage or modern. One is only able to properly authenticate the type, brand, model, and era of watch that one has a specific understanding of authenticity for. If I were to compare this to cooking skills, you have learned to cook one dish, and doesn’t mean that you know how to make others. But the more dishes you learn to cook, the easier and quicker it will be for you to pick up new dishes.

                  Keeping this in mind, here are two Omega Constellation Chronometers, the first an ST 168.0056 from 1972 and the second, a Double Eagle 1511.51.00 from 2006.








                  These two timepieces require totally different understandings in their respective Authenticity issues, not applicable to one another. Just because someone can authenticate one, does not imply they know how to authenticate the other. The same can be said, though to a lesser extent, for the next two Omegas, both Seamaster. They too require awareness of different aspects of authenticity.






                  For the Seamaster Professional Chronometer (SMP 300m, on the left) from 1998, one needs to be aware of the hoards of replicas and fakes in the late-1990s, such as those produced in Hong Kong and Taiwan. For the Seamaster “Brest” Quartz from 1982, there are less problems with copies, but caution is still to be maintained. It is these last two watches that I’d like to use as examples to demonstrate how their measure of authenticity can differ when it comes to replacement of components. Now, there are parts of a watch that can be considered as consumables, i.e. parts designed to wear out over time requiring replacement. These might include crystal, crown, and bezel insert.

                  Replacing consumable parts will not affect authenticity much, but I’d like to talk about the replacement of a component that is not really meant to be replaced, i.e. the movement. This is to bring us back to the question asked by pedro44 above. What if, for some peculiar reason, the movement needs to be replaced, including cases where this is done by either the authorized service center or even the manufacturer? First the SMP…

                  This diver is equipped with the Omega Automatic Cal 1120 (left), which is based on the ETA 2892-A2 (right).




                  However, the Omega 1120 and the base ETA movements are not identical in specifications. Omega fans like to say that Omega made some extensive modifications to the 2892-A2, but the truth is that, as with all modern Omega movements, ETA manufactured the 1120 exclusively to the spec required by Omega, including all the décor that makes it look nice. They are also of course already adjusted and certified as “chronometers” when the complete modules were sent to Omega, who only need to case the movements into their watches. But anyway, despite the fact that one can probably drop an ETA 2892 into the case and have a functioning watch, the difference between the two movements is enough to render the SMP inauthentic.

                  However, if one were to replace the Omega 1120 with another chronometer-certified 1120 from another Omega, or if Omega were to do this for you, then it would not be detectable—not by me, not by a watchmaker. It would, for all practical purposes, be considered a genuine watch. The only issue in such case would be the documentation, i.e the chronometer certificate would not match the serial number of the movement. Let’s turn our attention to the Seamaster Brest, powered by Omega Quartz Cal 1430, base ETA 255.411.






                  The Omega 1430 is a 6-jewel unadjusted movement, with no modification above its base ETA quartz calibre, and near-identical with the exception of being signed (top of circuit module). Most modern quartz movements are designed to be replaced as a whole unit when faults occur, rather than to be disassembled and repaired. Given that battery acid leaks are a common occurrence, it is not strange for quartz modules to be replaced by a service center of the manufacturer. Neither would affect authenticity.

                  However, as the Omega 1430 and ETA 255.411 are identical in specifications and quality of construction and finish, it could be argued that such replacement would not entirely render the watch in-authentic, though one may still like to avoid buying such an example. Perhaps quartz watches are less affected in value by having a non-original movement, or it could be that modern collectors are less interested in these watches, and thus there was not a lot of collector’s value to be lost to begin with.

                  What would you say to this next one?… The watch is a vintage Hamilton US Military-Issued MIL-W-46374D, a manual-wind from 1988.






                  The movement is the ETA 2801-2, the hand-wind version of the ubiquitous ETA 2824. Here again, the caliber is unadjusted and devoid of décor, as one would expect of a MIL-issued field watch, though it is signed “Hamilton”.






                  If it were necessary to replace its movement, would dropping in a standard ETA 2801-2 affect its value as a collector’s item? It might indeed, but the value of having its original movement would, in this case, be small, as the mass portion of its collector’s value is derived from its history, design, military specs, and for this specimen, condition. What about this homegrown Magrette Regattare Vintage Bronze LE with its Citizen Miyota Automatic Cal 82xx?






                  I don’t think I’m far off to say that this watch is indeed collectible, and I have seen prices going up already. However, given that inside is an unsigned standard Miyota 8200 Series, if the movement were to be totally replaced with an identical spec 82xx, I do not see how it could 1) be detectable, and 2) affect the value of the Magrette in any way. What do you all think?

                  For further examples of movement and authenticity, newer members are encouraged to read one of our topics from seven years ago. Please keep in mind, though, that the discussion took place in 2011, before the rise of the Chinese OEM supply chain that enabled the birth of micro-brand industry that we see today. Here’s the link… https://www.timekeeper.co.nz/forum/w...=4580#post4580

                  Next, I’d like to consider current Seiko entry-level mechanical watches, including their entry-level automatic divers that we all love. If you know anything about entry-level Seiko at all, you would have heard of the term “mod” or “modding” as it applies to these watches. Here are some images borrowed from gearpatrol.com






                  These creations of modding enthusiasts are non-original, but are not counterfeit or fake in any way. None are intended to give a mistaken impression of what they are, none are attempting to mislead you into thinking they are some thing they are not. There are no deception involved in these modded Seiko, and that includes not deceiving you into thinking they are other Seiko models that they aren’t. Mods includes this popular makeover of a Seiko 5 Sports SNZH57 into a FiftyFive Fathoms.




                  Image source: timetapestry.blogspot.com


                  Though the dial is clearly inspired by the Blancpain Fifty Fathoms, the case back is left stock Seiko 5, and no one in their right mind would mistaken this mod for an actual Blancpain. These modded Seiko live outside the confines of authenticity, and the watch communities are fine with them, as long as there are no attempts to defraud. The situation would be different if I were to take my Seiko Prospex SBDC001 “Black Sumo”






                  Mod it by changing the dial to a custom yellow dial that replicates the dial on another Sumo, the Seiko Thailand Limited Edition SBDC017, along with matching yellow bezel insert and aftermarket sapphire crystal, to make it look closer to a Yellow Sumo LE.



                  g


                  This would, to most Seiko enthusiasts, be an attempt to deceive, to pass off as a more expensive and rarer model. This is not an acceptable mod of a Seiko diver. We see this happening more than we’d like on certain vintage Seiko divers, and the one that springs to mind most is the fabrication of a counterfeit Seiko Cal 6306 150m Diver. At the time of its production in the late-1970s, the 6306 Diver was a Japan Domestic Market (JDM) version of the popular International version, the 6309-704x cushion-case diver.

                  While the two variants share the same case, they had different movements, and due to smaller production numbers and shorter production period, the Japanese 6306 is rarer. Its market value reflects this, and they can go for twice the price of a similar condition 6309. The thing, though, is that the Seiko Cal 6306 was also used in a few other Seiko sports watches of the period, and these days, the inevitable greed to people takes over, resulting in the butchering of many 6306-equipped watches that aren’t divers.





                  This is, again, a blatant scam, and the watch has a pure Franken-Seiko. The take-away for this is to avoid all 6306-700x 150m Diver that either has a suspicious case back or reproduction dial.



                  PART II


                  ...I'll continue with Part II in my next post.
                  Last edited by Don; 18-03-18, 18:24.
                  A watch journey that also serves the betterment of others is one worth taking.

                  Comment


                  • #69
                    Another great post, Don. Looking forward to part 2. With regard to your thoughts on the Magrette (or any other piece that utilises a factory standard movement), I agree that it shouldn't matter at all*. In fact, if I was purchasing used I'd probably be happier to find it has a new(er) movement, as long as I could be satisfied that the replacement had been competently carried out.

                    I have a couple of watches using the 7s26 movement, one of them almost 20 years old and never been serviced. If it ever finally gives up the ghost a service is going to set me back >$100, a new movement $60 or so on ebay. I doubt the new movement would have a detrimental affect on the (albeit fairly low) used value of the watch. A bit like an old Ford with a brand new engine.

                    *However, I believe the Magrette was a limited edition piece, most of Dion's are. Do you feel that would or should have any bearing on deciding whether a piece should remain intact and completely original, even with a bog standard (and cheap) movement?
                    If I think of something witty, I'll be sure to write it here.

                    Comment


                    • #70
                      Originally posted by sjb View Post
                      Another great post, Don. Looking forward to part 2. With regard to your thoughts on the Magrette (or any other piece that utilises a factory standard movement), I agree that it shouldn't matter at all*. In fact, if I was purchasing used I'd probably be happier to find it has a new(er) movement, as long as I could be satisfied that the replacement had been competently carried out.

                      I have a couple of watches using the 7s26 movement, one of them almost 20 years old and never been serviced. If it ever finally gives up the ghost a service is going to set me back >$100, a new movement $60 or so on ebay. I doubt the new movement would have a detrimental affect on the (albeit fairly low) used value of the watch. A bit like an old Ford with a brand new engine...
                      Thank you, Neil. I appreciate your comments on it, and it serves as a great feedback for me. Good questions too, by the way, and one that I hope Part II will cover, so please stay tuned … I will revisit the point you brought up about your Seiko 7S26 watch in a later section too.

                      I would like to say, though, that the primary reason in me bring up examples about replacing movements was that it relates to pedro44’s question, and it demonstrated my point about the importance understanding authenticity issues for each specific watch. That is, there is no universal check list that one could use to authenticate every kind of watch. Furthermore, the degree to which an example can deviate from its factory original state and still retain collector’s value is different for different watches. I chose movement replacement to illustrate the most extreme of all possible replacements to a used watch.

                      Apart from the replacement of quartz modules for reasons discussed, the scenario painted out for mechanical movements were purely hypothetical of the extreme kind. I look at mechanical watch movements as like car engines that, over the decades will need periodic maintenance and an full overhaul once in a while. But properly maintained, the internal combustion engine should have no trouble lasting half a century, without needing to be replaced—same with mechanical movements. For cars/watches we already own—like your Seiko 7S26—we may have look into different options if the engine/movement is irreparable.

                      However, as a car|watch buyer, we want to avoid buying a car/watch that will need its engine|movement replaced to run/function The reason being that said car|watch may have been poorly maintained or misused in some way for the engine|movement to fail in such a manner. For a car, this means that the transmission or suspension could have hidden problems as well, and best to look for another specimen... Back to your observation about the Regattare Vintage Bronze (mine was the brass one)…


                      Originally posted by sjb View Post
                      ...I believe the Magrette was a limited edition piece, most of Dion's are. Do you feel that would or should have any bearing on deciding whether a piece should remain intact and completely original, even with a bog standard (and cheap) movement?

                      Neil, my fantasy hypothetical extreme would entertain this route only...

                      Originally posted by Don View Post

                      ...if the movement were to be totally replaced with an identical spec 82xx,...

                      ...and I’ll probably add to it that the replacement Miyota movement should look identical, because these—I’m guessing Cal 8215?--come in more than one version and finish. The reason for this will be in Part II.





                      It is interesting what I think you are hinting at, i.e. you feel it would be important for this Magrette to remain original due to its rarity, as perhaps translating to higher collector’s value. This is a good add-on to my Part I on movement replacement—mine was focusing not on the collector’s value of watches but the differences their original movements had to the respective base ETAs... Yes, I agree that the higher the collector’s value for a given watch, the more important the originality is. If you want to adopt this view point, however, you’ll need an objective method for assessing collector’s value. For this, please see my 3-of-5 Postulate, posted seven years ago on this forum…

                      https://www.timekeeper.co.nz/forum/w...=5458#post5458

                      You could say, indeed, that the more of those five criteria a watch satisfies, the more important its originality will be.
                      Last edited by Don; 11-03-18, 18:35.
                      A watch journey that also serves the betterment of others is one worth taking.

                      Comment


                      • #71
                        Hi Don - my first time back on the forum for a while and reading this opus reminds me what a great little community this is. I'm struggling to think of another enthusiast forum in any field of interest where a senior member would devote so much time and effort to share their invaluable knowledge (unless maybe, they had something to sell or something to prove). You sir, are a legend! (And, in the inconceivable case that you ever tire of staring at that pie pan, you know how to find me.)
                        None of us are as smart as all of us.

                        Comment


                        • #72
                          Should we transfer this to the tech/ ref sect for ease of reference or is it better suited here here
                          Rest easy Matty , My best Mate and Son

                          Comment


                          • #73
                            Originally posted by YeahNah View Post
                            Hi Don - my first time back on the forum for a while and reading this opus reminds me what a great little community this is. I'm struggling to think of another enthusiast forum in any field of interest where a senior member would devote so much time and effort to share their invaluable knowledge (unless maybe, they had something to sell or something to prove). You sir, are a legend! (And, in the inconceivable case that you ever tire of staring at that pie pan, you know how to find me.)
                            Wayne! Great to see you back, and thank you for the generous comment. Maybe I should package this for sale, hahaha ...though, please don’t mistaken my intention as being too noble just yet. ...It is, in fact, quite self-serving. Though, it’s not just for “myself", but rather “ourselves”.

                            I know that, for many of us—and I have been there myself—we tend to have this idea of “my watch, my money”, i.e. my fate only, none of anyone’s business. But I’d like us to all think about something… Let’s imagine a watch layperson—not a WIS, not interested in watches, not on our forum, nor buy watches regularly. Let’s call him “Tom”.

                            Tom has a sudden urge to buy a vintage Omega, just for the fact that it would look cool and different on him. He goes on TradeMe, sees an Omega he likes and can afford, buys it, then wears it occasionally until whenever he gets bored of it. Like all of us, Tom has a social network, made up of friends, family, co-workers, ect., but his brief interest in this vintage timepiece is not part of that social network—his network didn't originate from such interest.

                            Each one of us on this forum, as well as those reading this who are not but are part of the local watch scene, are not like Tom. We are purely connected as a social network linked by our common interest in watches. It is why members here help each other with watches or watch advice, and because what affects a node in the network would affect the rest of us. It is self-care, self-enhancement, and self-preservation.

                            Here’s the thing… our watches are also nodes within that network, connected together through us.

                            When a member buys a nice watch and shows off a wrist shot, I am happy 1) for him, and 2) for me... because I am part of that the network... That new watch enriches the experience of the owner, and also enriches the network to which it is now connected. This is what separates us from Tom. What watch Tom decides to buy has little impact on others, but what we bring into our network, as a new node, has repercussions on the network, be it positive or negative—maybe within a short time, maybe not in our lifetime but that of our children or grandchildren.

                            If I bought a counterfeit or Franken- vintage, knowingly or otherwise, I would be adding that watch to our community—it becomes your watch too, and later your children’s, or their children’s.

                            Now, when I buy a vintage watch, I ask myself, “Do I want my watch community to own this watch? Is it worthy of being Wayne’s, Harlan’s, Steve’s, Paul’s, Tony’s, Petes’, Hammer’s, Neil’s, Harry’s, ibrar’s or others’?” ...If the answer is “no”, then I have a responsibility not to bring it into my network.

                            I realize that not everybody can or want to adopt this idea—it does lack the fun/excitement factor—but if more of us at least have this awareness when we buy, we can make decisions that, beautifully, serves ourselves and others at the same time. This is the true reason that I have taken the time on this topic.

                            A watch journey that also serves the betterment of others is one worth taking.

                            Comment


                            • #74
                              Thanks Don

                              Read the whole thread this morning, I just wish I was there in the beginning to partake.
                              I will look at vintage more confidently now, a lot of the mines have been painted red in the mine field.
                              The others we now have the tools to learn more about.
                              Last edited by Sarbie; 17-03-18, 08:20.
                              harlansmart commented

                              strap whore = Sarbie

                              Comment


                              • #75
                                Originally posted by Sarbie View Post
                                Thanks Don

                                Read the whole thread this morning, I just wish I was there in the beginning to partake.
                                I will look at vintage more confidently now, a lot of the mines have been painted red in the mine field.
                                The others we now have the tools to learn more about.
                                Thank you for joining us! Yes, I wish you saw this earlier too, but I did just see the comments you've made along the way this morning, and appreciate that.

                                Anyway, you've walked in just as Act Two ended, and we're about to start Act Three ...So, please do check back again later.

                                A watch journey that also serves the betterment of others is one worth taking.

                                Comment

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